Capitalism

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My deep-rooted belief in the American free enterprise system, also known as capitalism, has made it harder and harder to enjoy political statements thinly disguised as entertainment from Hollywood, TV, and the music industry because so many movies, songs, shows, and performers are insistent on bashing business and evil corporations as if they were piñatas filled only with ill-gotten profits.  Especially painful is having to balance my love of the music of Bruce Springsteen, a local hero from college days, whose politics seem to lean increasingly far left toward non-existent Utopias of fairness, equal outcomes, and overreaching government control known as socialism and communism.

Bruce Springsteen's "Wrecking Ball" Hits Hard About Lost Work

Bruce Springsteen's "Wrecking Ball" Hits Hard About Lost Work

With the release of Bruce’s ambitious new album  “Wrecking Ball”, I have had my usual concerns whether I could balance any one-sided sermonizing with music and musicianship that is always engaging and risk-taking. I wasn’t encouraged by this interview in Rolling Stone, in which the exceedingly well-compensated New Jersey sons, Jon Stewart and the Boss, spoke unironically  about income disparity in the USA.  Both guys are wonderful examples of the American Dream. They need to stop feeling guilty about their success. Each one is an industry unto himself, employing a long list of people wherever he goes. Bruce especially sells a lot of records, concert tickets, memorabilia, clothing, and concert concessions, all in the name of rock and roll art. On top of that, he is an extraordinarily charitable guy, always giving funds and support and time to national and local causes. He has nothing left to prove, yet he still seems to be bothered about now living in a “Mansion on the Hill”.

When I finally picked up a copy of “Wrecking Ball” at the ultimate evil retailer, Wal-Mart, I wasn’t surprised to hear songs of anger directed at greedy bankers and corporate fat cats. However, upon repeated listenings, I have found myself moved by  another recurring message from Bruce — that work is what gives each of us a purpose (as well as income) and it is an essential thread that holds our communities, states, and nation together.

I encourage you to listen to songs like “Jack of All Trades”, “Death To My Hometown”,  and “Rocky Ground”, in which Bruce eloquently speaks to a middle class devastated by job loss and by the sickening realization that prospects ahead look bleak and bleaker. It does not have to be this way, however. While it is troubling that too many still put their faith in politicians to create and manage commerce, and that others are looking for special favors for their companies or industries (crony capitalism, not to be confused with actual capitalism), the free enterprise system here is still alive and just needs to be left alone to work.  And so that a lot more Americans can get back to work.

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Earlier this week, I was distressed to read (online) that long-time b2b publisher Penton had made a decision to give up on print. At first, I thought the move to all-digital applied across the board to each and every Penton trade magazine. Turns out it is strictly their tech group titles. With the cost of paper, ink, and press time combined with the explosion of tablets and e-readers, it is mighty tempting for publishers to give up on their print properties, especially if pages are down and advertisers are off.

I’m a print guy and always will be. I’d far rather hold a newspaper, magazine, or book in my hands, than strain my eyesight scrolling, adjusting screens, and absorbing pixels. Also, as our art director pointed out this week, doctors and hair salons are never going to fill their waiting rooms with stacks of Kindles and iPads.

However, some publishers are making the most of digital platforms and they are making it harder for print to keep up. QR codes and MS Tags are being used (some would say overused) to link ads to relevant online content and measurability. Meanwhile, ICIS and others are producing digital platforms that integrate rich media. Our client, Graham Engineering, was able to run a full page ad in the print issue. Then, we adapted it for their digital issue on the Ceros platform, integrating an extended video clip within the space of the ad (see page 6).  Sure beats banner and pay per click advertising.

The other way to look at this is for publishers being in the content business and connecting with readers (viewers?) in the way(s) that each prefers — print publication, digital version of print publication, web site, video clips, e-newsletters, webinars, in-person at events (and virtual events), and of course, all the flavors of social media.

It can be done and it is working . I had that reinforced by Michael Pitts this week, a hard-working ad sales rep doing his job the old-fashioned way, making face-to-face appointments with new prospects. What was he selling? The Philadelphia Tribune Media Group properties. Yes, the oldest, continually running African- American newspaper (since 1884) is still going strong. It was thrilling to hear that weekly print circulation is at 221,977, the vast majority of delivered to subscribers’ front steps. That’s a loyal and engaged readership.

The Philadelphia Tribune is America's longest-running African-American newspaper published continuously since 1884.

The Philadelphia Tribune is America's longest-running African-American newspaper published continuously since 1884.

The Tribune hasn’t been content to rest on its considerable laurels either. In recent years, it has launched Metro editions taking it to specific Philly neighborhoods, as well as the Delaware and Montgomery County suburbs. It has also added special print publications like the Sojourner, a quarterly visitor’s guide to the region, and the Tribune magazine, with special editions on the Most Influential African Americans, Top African American Attorneys, and Women of Achievement.

Of course, like most newspapers, the Tribune has made its web site its 24/7 news platform, off which to build content for print via what is happening right now, what is engaging readers, and what demands the longer, more thoughtful coverage that print allows. Also, getting two-way conversations going via social media community pages. As Michael noted, the tragic passing of Whitney Houston has generated the kind of interest locally that it has nationally. PhillyTrib.com offers some outstanding run of site ad opportunities, as well as rich media ad units that are going to reward sponsors generously.

I tire of the debate that digital is killing print. I’d far rather see examples like a 125-year-old newspaper continuing to successfully publish by delivering great content that doesn’t divide print and digital, but balances it instead.

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Gillette spends a lot of money on big budget well-made razor and blade advertising.

Gillette spends a lot of money on big budget well-made razor and blade advertising.

In a digital marketplace crowded with marketing channels and marketing messages, businesses are faced with the age-old question — How do you cut through the clutter to get attention? With awesome creative, of course!

I just watched a late-night tv commercial from Gillette for ProGlide shaving cartridges that promises to last 5 weeks before dulling. It was aimed at the young male 20something demographic. It featured global travel, exotic locales, and the idea of around the world on a single blade. It was excellent in a big budget epic way. I’ve recently seen another well-done Gillette commercial for the Fusion ProGlide Styler featuring noted music and acting personalities with facial hair, André 3000, Adrien Brody, and Gael Garcia Bernal. A fresh approach in a competitive category. I’ve also stopped by the men’s shaving aisle during a grocery run and been overwhelmed by blade choices. Survey Gillette’s product lineup here for what I mean. Add in Schick’s offerings and it can be genuinely stupefying to remember what brand and version is in your own medicine cabinet. What’s more, razor blades now all come in plastic lockboxes that need to be opened at checkout in order to prevent shoplifting of these increasingly high-priced personal care necessities.

I’m guessing Michael Dubin found himself similarly challenged to buy and pay for a razor and blades when he conceived his new start-up DollarShaveClub.com. A blade of the month club? Sounds like it may have been something tried and failed during the dot.com boom and bust period. Wrong. This enterprise is 2.0 conceived, built, and rolling.

I dare you to watch this YouTube viral gem without chuckling multiple times at how well-crafted on a micro budget it is. This isn’t Victor Kiam “I liked the shaver so much I bought the company” — it is Michael Dubin taking you behind the scenes at his entire start-up operation to cheekily demonstrate why his blades are so inexpensive and such great values at the same time. The clip is so entertaining that it has already been featured content on Mashable , All Things D, and Huffington Post and is already over one million views on YouTube.

The DollarShaveClub web site is very focused and offers good, better, best choices.

The DollarShaveClub web site is very focused and offers good, better, best choices.

But the terrific creative doesn’t end there. The DollarShaveClub.com web site itself is a model of smart sales copy, good/better/best consumer choices, terrific graphic design, and ease of e-commerce. In other words, creative and commerce are in collusion for maximum results. Big package goods corporations have a lot invested in brand identities and line extensions, including big ad production and media budgets to feed the sales pipeline. Michael Dubin doesn’t have those luxuries. But he does have a winning concept and an awesome creative vision.

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I haven’t talked package design in awhile, but sometimes there is one jumping around on store shelves just screaming for attention and cannot be denied. I’d like you to meet PEST OFFENSE, a plug-in device that uses ultrasound to repel rats, mice, roaches, and other household pests.

PEST OFFENSE pushes a lot of buttons with its package, but especially the one marked patriotism.

PEST OFFENSE pushes a lot of buttons with its package, but especially the one marked patriotism.

Pest Offense Products, Inc. uses every sales angle it can to grab consumers by the lapels. There’s the “As Seen On TV” icon to add instant credibility — we all know that nothing in life is worthwhile if it hasn’t been televised.  There’s the environmental pitch — no hazardous chemicals and no harm to people, pets, and food.  There’s even the heartstrings appeal — in this case, a picture of device inventor Don Hodgskin with his lovely grandkids. The problem here is that Don and his creative package design team have succumbed to the desire to say and sell too much — the kitchen sink approach, in which 10 pounds is crammed into a 5 pound bag (or in this case, folding carton).

Because of this confusing mix of messages, I could have easily walked past this product, but there was one front and center pronouncement I couldn’t ignore — the most dubious patriotic product plug I have ever seen. I never object to American manufacturers who put our flag on their products to underscore that they are made right here stateside. I am also pleased to see someone call out his product as “An American Invention.” However, Old Glory coupled with the catch-phrase “Putting the USA back to work” is more than I can bear. I appreciate Mr. Hodgskin announcing his intention to hire American workers, but we’re talking about a small, plug-in, ultrasound pest device, not an auto plant or a new steel mill. Our national economic challenges run deep, and even factoring in that every small step helps, it is more than a little disheartening to see America’s once (and still) formidable manufacturing prowess leveraged with late-night infomercial pitch tactics.

Assembled isn't quite the same as Made in America.

Assembled isn't quite the same as Made in America.

The kicker comes when flipping the package over to read the following words on the back — Assembled in The USA. To put a fine point on this, PEST OFFENSE is not fully manufactured here. It is put together from some percentage of parts made elsewhere.  Ouch. If you are going to wave the flag for American manufacturing, please don’t wind up sounding like a dictionary-embellishing politician.

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Latest Facebook movement is on behalf of kids with cancer.

Latest Facebook movement is on behalf of kids with cancer.

As 2012 starts, we are suffering from a dearth of leadership, and the larger the institution or company, the more likely that no one wants to step up and steer the ship. Latest example is Mattel, which has a social media storm developing outside its corporate walls and it is over something that could be turned into such a positive for all and on all levels. If you haven’t heard about the Beautiful and Bald Barbie Facebook page/group, here is a good primer on it. Essentially, someone came up with a brilliantly simple idea to support little girls going through cancer care and attendant hair loss (as well as those whose mothers are) — a Barbie, the universal doll symbol of beauty, minus all her signature golden locks. With every other possible celebrity and situational version of Barbie, it is amazing that Mattel did not think of this themselves, and therein lies the problem. So far, the official response to this Facebook movement is that official corporate policy is to not accept ideas from outside.

I suppose Mattel is grappling with a lot of legal questions as to who owns this idea and how are they compensated on future sales. Incredibly, this story adds another layer — that early last year Mattel custom-produced a bald Barbie for a single little girl undergoing chemo. So, there is even precedence here.

I have a unique perspective on this, being from the PR industry, and having had a child successfully treated for leukemia. A children’s onco ward can be a scary, lonely place and little gestures of caring and kindness go a long way. How can Mattel be so tone deaf — kids with cancer and a chance to do something socially redemptive — it seems like the easiest corporate green light ever.  Where is the downside?

No response to Bald Barbie movement on any Barbie or Mattel pages.

No response to Bald Barbie movement on any Barbie or Mattel pages.

Instead, with the Beautiful and Bald Barbie Facebook page now approaching 100,000 likes, and a lot of negative comments posted about Mattel, the official Mattel and Barbie Facebook pages, apps, and web site pages do not have any responses to this movement. However, you will find this bit of mission statement gobbledygook:

“”Leadership” at Mattel is the ability to develop and communicate a compelling picture of the future that inspires and motivates others to take action. Leaders at Mattel align themselves with Mattel’s core values, exhibit leadership competencies and drive for success in our business strategies. In this way, we will work to achieve our vision, “Creating the Future of Play.” Every day as Mattel’s 30,000 employees worldwide strive to realize that vision, our leadership team is guiding the way.”

Someone on this page at Mattel needs to stop talking about leadership, throw policy manuals out the window, and actually lead.  It’s the smart thing to do, the right thing to do, and the ONLY thing to do.

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The Genuardi's grocery brand is going away.

The Genuardi's grocery brand is going away.

Very sad news to report — the death of another beloved Delaware Valley icon this week. But to be honest, the loss was actually a fait acompli, following a long, slow, painful, and predictable process that began in 2001 when the Genuardi family finalized the sale of its grocery chain business, begun in 1920, to West Coast based Safeway.

You can read all about it here, including the closures and store selloffs of Genuardi locations to Carlisle, PA- based but Netherlands-corporation-owned Giant.

The grocery business has always been tough, with tight margins, but lately it has gotten even tougher. Grocery stores aren’t going anywhere — it is the smaller family grocery chains that are under increasing pressure from the corporate giants. Not many left in this area. Brown’s ShopRite, Redner’s, Weis come to mind, as well as independents Thriftway/Shop ‘n Bag. The latter two were once separate Newton clients shortly before they joined forces. We still feature one of our Thriftway spots on our web site accessible from the A La Carte/TV link here .

The passing of the Genuardi’s brand is especially troubling, because a little over a decade ago, it was a shining star on the Philadelphia metro food scene. Their St. Davids store was the flagship of the chain and it ushered in the whole concept of specialty foods and an in-store food court, before Wegman’s and Whole Foods arrived on the scene.

Genuardi’s stores were also known for cleanliness, service, and a connection to the local communities where they were located. One quiet example of that were the number of special needs people they always seemed to employ.

It is troubling that America is losing more and more of its family-run businesses in favor of corporate ones. The sense of personal connection (and personal stake on the part of the local owner) is missing, whether it is at big bank branches, home improvement stores, and chain restaurants. When your name is on the store, you tend to ensure that everything is at its best and when problems occur, they are solved quickly and on a first-name basis so the customers understand their business is important. We’ve covered this topic before.

I hear the word “stakeholder” a lot in public company business these days, and I have to laugh. Very few of these people have their names and reputations at stake when it is a major corporation that employs them. The senior most executives often are not even located on any premises where customer interactions take place that they can directly witness or take part in.

Despite the loss of  the Genuardi’s brand, Delaware Valley residents still have plenty of grocery options. From foodie stores like Wegman’s and Whole Foods, to low cost leaders like Wal-Mart and Aldi. Giant who purchased 16 Genuardi store locations runs its stores well and was one of the first in the area to be open 24 hours. Perhaps this is just another case history for the marketing/branding textbooks — Safeway might have done better rebranding locally as Safeway in 2001 vs. trying to preserve Genuardi’s as a family-owned brand when it was no longer one.

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McDonald's Happy Meals and other kids' fast food meals are under fire in SF.

McDonald's Happy Meals and other kids' fast food meals are under fire in SF.

The nanny-state central planners are working overtime again, and at a time when many families are struggling to put meals on the table, let alone holiday gifts under the tree, San Francisco city government has just passed a new ordinance that bans the inclusion of free toys in fast food kids meals that do not meet their tough anti-obesity standards. McDonald’s is the first to respond and they are doing a “workaround” — the previously free toys can now be purchased for 10 cents apiece. Other fast food chains will have to plan their own compliance measures.

Is childhood obesity good? Of course not. Should government at all levels be policing what each of us eats? Of course not. We would collectively be better off as individuals, and as a nation, if we weighed less, got more exercise, and were healthier overall. But we all need to eat to live, and the last time I checked, most of us also make a point of eating what we like and tastes good to us. Some of that carries more calories and fats than things that taste less good to us. McDonald’s would not be the global giant it is today if it were in the business of selling sprouts in Brussels and bean varieties.

Hollywood's love affair with Happy Meals toys represents collateral damage in anti-obesity fast-food wars.

Hollywood's love affair with Happy Meals toys represents collateral damage in anti-obesity fast-food wars.

There is something at best tone-deaf, and at worst mean-spirited, about punishing children to force fast food restaurants to take away toys that have been marketplace favorites for decades, all in the interest of better nutrition. Right goal, arguably, but definitely wrong strategy. Those crying the most may be Hollywood executives because McDonald’s has long had a marketing relationship in which Happy Meal toys have been used as promotional vehicles for kid-friendly and family films. Toy collectors are not going to be too pleased with this development (and multi-city trend) either.

Meanwhile, it is just smart business practice for McDonald’s and other fast food restaurants to market test menu items that offer healthier eating alternatives so that kids and parents have a choice in what they have to order. Fruit salads are never going to replace Big Macs in terms of overall sales, but that doesn’t mean people won’t order them when they are in the mood for that fare. Meanwhile, McDonald’s is always experimenting, even in marketing — this morning was the first time I have ever gotten a third-party e-mail coupon from McDonald’s. Think I will forward it to San Francisco city council and let them know what we, in the city of cheesesteaks and hoagies, prefer from our fast-food franchises.

Big Macs and Large Fries are still welcome in the City of Brotherly Love (and Meaty Sandwiches).

Big Macs and Large Fries are still welcome in the City of Brotherly Love (and Meaty Sandwiches).

Update: This new site is being promoted by McDonald’s via banner ads on LinkedIn. A listening tour is planned, so whether you are committed to current fare or new better nutritional options, speak now or forever hold your peace (peas) (mind your peas and Qs) (oh forget it).

Update 2: McDonald’s is a global brand, which means its Happy Meals headaches are not limited to San Francisco city council. This week, the government of Sao Paulo, Brazil is fining them $1.8 million for encouraging unhealthy eating habits in children. Google poverty in Brazil and you can see making sure kids are fed period still remains a challenge, so this fine seems to be a distraction from bigger issues at best.

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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qhm-22Q0PuM

Advertising is all about beautiful people (aka supermodels), looking beautiful, acting beautiful, and being beautiful while using the sponsor’s product. While this type of advertising is easy on the eyes, there is so much, it can become like wallpaper, blending into the background, barely attracting attention. This week, a new presidential campaign tv ad launched that so jarringly broke the beauty mold that it was all that every media pundit has focused on ever since. I’m talking about Herman Cain’s Smoking Man spot.

The Smoking Man (not to be confused with that mysterious X Files figure) is actually Cain’s Chief of Staff, Mark Block, who while delivering a weirdly cadenced but believably impassioned endorsement of his boss, proceeds to literally blow smoke, because he is enjoying a cigarette outside.

What is going on here? How can a man responsible for helping his boss project a positive, electable image allow himself to be videotaped matter-of-factly puffing on a cigarette. Commentators across the political spectrum, almost in unison, wondered aloud why he would set such a bad example for young people. Hint: it wasn’t by accident!

It is hard to stun people in 2011, but amazingly, this ad has managed to move the meter off the chart. The question is why? Cigarettes are a legal product. They appear often in popular entertainment (films, tv shows, and music videos). Our current president has been known to sneak outside the White House to light up. So, why is this ad so surprising?

It’s been a ridiculously long time since anyone in a tv ad smoked (except for an anti-smoking PSA). And cigarettes while legal are perhaps the most heavily regulated products on the market (with even more regulations proposed). And now, we’re getting to the crux of this message — the current regulatory and capriciously restrictive environment of the United States. At a time when people on the right, left, and in the center are fed up with feelings of powerlessness, it is strangely liberating to see a man in a tv ad smoking a cigarette. It is un-PC. It is unhealthy. It is unnervingly appealing in a defy the nanny-state way.

Already the spot’s YouTube page has attracted nearly one million visitors. Less than 10,000 have weighed in to “like” or “dislike”, but the dislikes are running well ahead, not exactly a scientific poll, but a trend nonetheless.

It is too early to tell whether this is a spark for the Cain campaign or just a weird reminder that America is still free even if the Marlboro Man isn’t allowed to ride the broadcast range anymore.

Update: Election year news cycles are notoriously short. It’s exactly one week later and Mr. Cain is dealing with fire instead of smoke this week. So far, the sexual harassment allegations are sketchy, but the candidate’s handling of the media questioning has been spotty at best. Consistency and accuracy of story is critical when it comes to crisis PR.  If you believe the old adage that this is no BAD PR, Mr. Cain has had two news-dominating weeks.

When is the last time you saw a man smoke a cigarette in a TV spot?

When is the last time you saw a man smoke a cigarette in a TV spot?

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With each new profile of the late, truly great Steve Jobs (current cover story of Rolling Stone is especially well done), and with each new Apple announcement, we are reminded daily that at least one sector of the economy is doing just fine — the Steve Jobs sector. The man was a one man jobs-creating machine. It is isn’t just Apple (Mac PCs, iPods, iPhones, iTunes, iWantOneOfThoseToo), but all the companies whose ancillary products are made in support of Apple’s, plus the entertainment industry with music, videos, movies, shows delivered to your device du jour. He envisioned products that never existed but that the public will clamor for. Such as the iPhone 4S with a virtual personal assistant named Siri who is a fountain of answers.

One of the Jobs story angles I have found most fascinating and uplifting is his half-Syrian family tree. No one has written better about it than the insightful and eloquent Fouad Ajami (Wall Street Journal subscriber content only, I’m afraid). The news that adopted Steve Jobs’s biological father is a Syrian-American has been resonating throughout the Arab world. It should, and hopefully will, be a constant reminder that with more power and freedom in the hands of people, many more Steve Jobs can blossom and enrich humanity.

Unfortunately, even in the West, there is an inclination to control and manage and central plan the economy via government at all levels, but especially in DC. Hence, the Administration’s heavily flogged jobs bill, which promotes the creation of jobs in the public sector, and will in turn diminish the struggling private sector. We need both, but right now, the balance is badly off and the results aren’t pretty.

Employees Must Wash Hands, a Public-Private Sector Regulatory Cooperative

Employees Must Wash Hands, a Public-Private Sector Regulatory Cooperative

A trip to the Men’s Room yesterday at a Sonic fast food restaurant was a reminder that all regulations, or executions of regulations, are not making life better or clearer, except for providing unintended humor. The obligatory “Employees Must Wash Hands” sign has been upgraded with step-by-step photography, detailed instructions, and bilingual sections. Instead, I’ll take a handwashing reminder and recommendations from Siri any time.

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Olive Garden has a social media firestorm on its hands.

Olive Garden has a social media firestorm on its hands.

Hell hath no fury like an 80-year-old Kiwanis Club member denied the chance to proudly display the American flag during the Club’s meeting/meal. Just ask the Olive Garden restaurant chain, which is learning unexpected lessons in handling crisis PR and social media wildfires following the incident and subsequent flare-up. Here is a link to one of the original news accounts, which took place at an Alabama location of the restaurant chain, not exactly the heart of PC policy USA.

Once this news hit the local news, it became a sound bite headline that spread nationally to places like the Drudge Report. By the time I saw the story, the Comments section on the page was loaded with angry posters, many of them Facebook commenters, who had already decided they were done eating another meal at ANY Olive Garden. What struck me was the explosion of the myth that social media, is wholly owned and operated by Generation Y. This is not your son’s (or grandson’s) Facebook network anymore. There are Hank Williams Jr. lookalikes looking like they just got the opportunity to defiantly stick it to ESPN. There are grandmothers forming a solidarity movement with the Kiwanis Club lady. The common theme was that an American corporation had knowingly decided to tread on Old Glory (or at least banish it from their premises) and each poster was weighing in as a former customer (with plans to virally make family and friends former customers as well). Ouch. Some posters noted that Olive Garden is part of a larger restaurant group and they named the other affiliated restaurant chains. The potential for business damage here remains huge.

Many Olive Garden customers are angry over the flag incident.

Many Olive Garden customers are angry over the flag incident.

At this point, I visited the Olive Garden Facebook page and corporate’s web site home page. Both contained the following explanation/apology intended to contain the damage and assure customers that this was not corporate policy and it truly was an isolated, unfortunate incident brought about by one manager or staffer acting in the absence of policy.

Official Olive Garden response to the "flag" incident.

Official Olive Garden response to the "flag" incident.

The following day, Olive Garden announced to the news media that the CEO would be personally apologizing to the Kiwanis lady. Given the heat and the fury out there, I suspect neither of these steps individually or together will be enough to undo the damage.

Lots of "tweets" about Olive Garden after the "flag" incident, too.

Lots of "tweets" about Olive Garden after the "flag" incident, too.

I predict that Olive Gardens will have to start couponing deals like crazy to win back lost customers and flying a flag twice the size of the ones at Perkins Pancake Houses outside all locations. This isn’t a case of isolated anecdotes about bad service or a cold meal. It is much more visceral and hits at the heart of American culture and patriotism. It isn’t clear what the decision-maker at the Alabama Olive Garden was thinking, but the default corporate answer to most such “special” requests these days is “No.” Sometimes the perpetual worry about offending “someone” clouds your ability to see you might wind up offending “nearly everyone.”

Does anyone still doubt the power of social media, especially when triggered by news media? Does anyone want to bet against civics lessons being added to corporate managerial training at every restaurant chain and retailer in America after this?

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